Meal Prep 101: How to make 20 meals for $25

This guest post is written by Richmond Howard for Good Financial Cents. Richmond runs the blog MealPrepify.

Four years ago my wife and I were almost broke. It was our first year of marriage and I had been out of a job for almost five months.

I wasn’t making money and I was about to start going to grad school. It’s hard to pay for grad school when you’re broke so I was applying for scholarships.

One of the scholarships required you to input a monthly budget of how much you were spending. Makes sense — they want to make sure you’re being a good steward of your resources and that you actually need the financial help.

The problem was I had no idea what we were actually spending. We were just kinda going by feel and trying to be frugal. We created an account with Mint and synced all of our accounts.

I still remember when my wife and I were sitting there watching the screen–waiting for all of the data to get sorted out to see the breakdown of our monthly spending.

It all looked normal at first. Our rent was $725. Car insurance was $200. Wifi was $30. Phone bill was around $100. Gym $40. Everything was checking out except one category.

Food / Restaurants: $825

Neither of us believed it, but it was our anniversary month so we chalked it up to the fancy dinner we went to. Surely, that’s what it was… We went back another month and saw $760. Then $730. Then back to $800.

The realization hit us hard.

For the last six months while I was unemployed and we were struggling to make ends meet — watching our bank accounts start to dip — we were spending more on food than rent for just our little family of two.

Like most people, we ate out too often for fun and for convenience.

Like most people, we were throwing away too much food that never got cooked.

Our food bill was out of control. We knew we had to find a way to save money on food, but we didn’t know how. We already felt like we were frugal when it came to food and we didn’t want to go back to the college diet of ramen and the chicken that’s marked down because it’s about to expire.

We wanted to eat real food that was good for us and good for our wallet.

We made a few major changes:

  • We completely stopped eating out for about two months.
  • We planned out our meals and didn’t let anything go to waste.

That worked for a while! We were eating all of our meals at home and our food spending dropped from $750+ to around $350.

It was exhausting though. We were cooking and cleaning multiple meals a day. It felt like we lived in the kitchen.

Then we started meal prepping.

We’d wake up early on Sundays to pick a few recipes and map out what we were going to eat that week. After church, we’d head straight to the grocery store and spent our afternoons making a week’s worth of food.

It took some time to get the hang of it, but meal prepping was a total game-changer for us. We started saving money and we weren’t spending 15 hours a week in the kitchen.

Here I am three years later and I now run a blog called MealPrepify where I help people learn how to meal prep and find great recipes so they can save time, money, and eat healthy doing it.

Today I want to give you my best tips and tricks to help you start saving money by meal prepping! I’ve also shared our favorite meal plan that we’ve used almost every single month to save money on food.

Meal Prep 101: 9 Tips to Start Meal Prepping

  • When I first started meal prepping, I was totally overwhelmed.
  • How do I pick recipes?
  • How much should I make?
  • How long will the food last?
  • Do I need to meal plan or just cook stuff and hope it goes together?

When I started looking for resources on meal prepping, most of it wasn’t helpful. The recipes they recommended were elaborate or unhealthy. The meal plans didn’t fit what I liked, and I usually ended up spending more time and money than I was saving.

Here are some helpful meal prep tips to get you started the right way:

1. Restaurant spending freeze

If you want to start meal prepping, the first thing you’ve got to do is stop eating out. If you’re anything like me, this is the hardest part. My wife and I are foodies and we love to try new places all over Houston, especially BBQ.

But there’s no way around it. If you want to save money on food and make meal prepping a habit, you have to force yourself to do it.

Your restaurant spending freeze doesn’t have to be forever, but commit for one month and see what happens. You’ll be amazed at how much money you save when you stop eating out.

2. Start small

The biggest mistake people make is trying to meal prep too much the first time. Start small. Pick 1-2 recipes you know you love and double the ingredients. The last thing you want to do is make a bunch of food that’ll go to waste.

3. Look in the freezer and pantry

The best place to start meal prepping is with stuff you’ve already got. Go make a list of all the meat you’ve got sitting in your freezer and find a way to meal prep with it. You’ll save money, reduce waste, and clear out space.

4. Create a list of super cheap meals

The key to saving money with meal prepping is to find cheap meals that you can make over and over again. My wife and I have a rotation of 7-10 meals that we absolutely love. They also keep our grocery budget in line and allow us to splurge in other places.

5. Find ingredient overlaps

The best meal prep hack is finding ingredients that work for multiple recipes. The fewer ingredients I have to buy at the grocery store, prep, chop, and cook, the better!

Grilled chicken is one of these for me. I’ll eat grilled chicken with a side of roasted vegetables, on a salad, or in a sweet potato. When I’m in a big hurry, I’ll grab a baggie of grilled chicken for a high-protein snack.

Bell peppers are another one. You can use bell peppers for fajitas, asian stir fries, or by themselves as a healthy snack.

6. Create a set time for meal prepping

If you want to meal prep consistently, then pick a set time to meal prep every week. My wife and I cook a week’s worth of lunches every Saturday afternoon and then we’ll double the amount for whatever we cook for dinner on Monday.

7. Get good storage containers

After you’ve finished all your meal prepping, you need to a way to store and save it all. We used to use regular plastic tupperware containers, but after a while we decided to upgrade to these glassware containers, which are better for heating, storing in the freezer, and cleaning in the dishwasher.

8. Map out your week

Meal prepping takes meal planning. Every Saturday morning, my wife and I wake up and we map out our entire week of meals. 

We actually put our meal plan into a google spreadsheet so we can see exactly what we’ll be eating. Then we put together a grocery list of everything we need to buy that week. We usually try to stock up on some healthy snacks as well.

The best part about keeping track of your meal plans is that you have your own bank of meal plans to pull from. Whenever we’re in a hurry we just pick a meal plan we’ve done before and head to the store!

9. Use the crockpot

There’s no question that using a crock pot is the easiest way to meal prep. All you have to do is dump in your ingredients, press a button, and wait 6-8 hours.

Turn it on before you go to bed and wake up with lunch and dinner already prepared. Here are some of our favorite cheap crockpot meals you can make for less than $3 a serving!

Sample Meal Plan: How we made 20 meals for $25 in one hour

People make meal planning way more complicated than it needs to be. I always pick three recipes that I want to eat for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Ideally they are cheap, healthy, and have some overlap in ingredients.

This is one of my go-to meal plans. It takes me about an hour of work to make 20 meals for $25.

Breakfast: Overnight oats

Meal prepping for breakfast is tough. Leftover eggs are rubbery and gross.

About a year ago I started making overnight oats and it was a game changer. Easy to make and incredibly cheap.

Overnight oats don’t require any cooking. Put them in a mason jar the night before with milk or water and they’re ready to go in the morning. The ratio is typically two parts liquid to one part oats. I typically do 1 cup of oatmeal, 1 cup water, and 1 cup milk.

You can add anything you want to the oats to fix them up! My favorites are strawberries, blueberries, bananas, peanut butter, and chocolate chips.

The oats need at least four hours to soak, but will last for 3-4 days. I usually add liquid to half my jars and then on Wednesday I’ll add milk and water to the second batch.

Every morning, grab a mason jar from the fridge and you’re ready to eat. Overnight oats are good cold or warmed up.

Est. price: $0.50/ serving

Lunch: Sheet pan chicken fajitas

My wife and I love using sheet pan recipes because they save time on clean-up and we can meal prep a week’s worth of lunch in one batch.

You can make these chicken fajitas in a few easy steps.

  1. Put 2lbs of chicken breast/thighs into a ziploc bag or bowl and cover it with your marinade of choice. I use a store bought marinade to save time and make it as easy as possible. Marinade for 30 minutes to a couple of hours.
  2. Slice 1 green bell pepper, red bell pepper, and onion.
  3. Cover the sheet pan with foil and dump the bell peppers & chicken on it.
  4. Cook for 20 minutes at 350 or so and check to make sure it’s done.
  5. Once the fajitas are made, you can eat them however you want! Stuff some tortillas or eat them with rice and beans. Eat the fajitas with some mixed greens and avocado for a healthy salad.

Est. price: $1.50/serving

Dinner: Quick coconut chicken curry

This coconut chicken curry recipe is one of our weeknight go-to meals! It’s cheap, healthy, and here’s how you make it:

  1. Put 2lbs chicken breast or thighs into a ziploc or bowl. Rub 4 tbsp curry paste all over them.
  2. Add 2 tbsp oil to a cooking pan and get hot. Add red onion and saute with 2 more tbsp curry paste. Cook for 5 minutes.
  3. Add chicken to the pan and sear both sides (2 minutes a side).
  4. Add coconut milk and put in oven for 12 minutes @ 400 degrees.
  5. When it’s done, you can eat the chicken curry with pita bread, rice, or by itself!

Est. price: $2.50/serving

Grocery List

If you want to give this meal plan a try, here’s a grocery list you can print off and take with you to the store.

  • Oatmeal
  • Milk
  • Optional oatmeal toppings you want: fruit, berries, nuts
  • 2lbs Chicken breast
  • 2 green bell peppers
  • 1 onions
  • 1 can black beans
  • 1 cup rice
  • Fajita marinade
  • 2lbs chicken thighs
  • 1.5 cup coconut milk
  • 4-6 teaspoons red curry paste
  • 1/2 cup diced red onion

Take Your Next Step in Meal Prepping

I don’t know where you’re at in life, but I truly believe that meal prepping can help everyone.

It can help the entrepreneur eat healthy and save money to reinvest in their business. It can help the young professional save money to put towards retirement. Meal prepping can save the stay at home parent hours of time every week in planning, shopping, cooking, and cleaning.

Take your first step today!

The post Meal Prep 101: How to make 20 meals for $25 appeared first on Good Financial Cents®.

Source: goodfinancialcents.com

17 Realistic Ways To Make $100 Per Day

There are a lot of ways to make $100 per day with a side hustle or online business. Here are some of the most realistic ways to make legit money online.

The post 17 Realistic Ways To Make $100 Per Day appeared first on Bible Money Matters and was written by Marc. Copyright © Bible Money Matters – please visit biblemoneymatters.com for more great content.

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Employment Resources: Five Steps for Finding a New Job

A woman reads various employment resources and books at a large white desk in front of a window.

The Congressional Budget Office believes the unemployment rate will hit 16% during the summer of 2020 due to the impact of the coronavirus. With so many people on the hunt for a new job, landing an interview and getting hired is going to prove difficult for many. But the truth is that getting a new job isn’t always easy even in the best of times, which is why using all possible employment resources is important.

Follow these five steps to leverage employment resources to help make your job hunt success more likely.

1. Set Yourself Apart with New Skills

If you find yourself unemployed for any reason—especially during an economic downturn such as the one related to the COVID-19 pandemic—you might not be able to find a job right away. It’s a good idea to turn to unemployment benefits if you qualify to help you cover expenses while you hunt for a new job.

Then, consider finding ways to make yourself
more attractive to potential employers. During times when the unemployment
numbers are particularly high, you can bet that your resume is going to be
competing with many others. If you’re able to demonstrate a skill that others
don’t have, you can set yourself apart during the application process.

Consider using your time during unemployment to learn skills that complement your existing ones—especially if other people with similar education and experience backgrounds might not have those skills. One way you can do this is to sign up for online courses through a service like Coursera. You can add skills such as data analytics, coding languages, spreadsheet use, or business analytics to your resume.

Learn New Skills with Coursera

2. Add Your Skills to a Well-Rounded, Engaging Resume

Once you have those new skills, you need to find the best way to work them into your resume. If you’re looking for a job at the same time everyone else is, your resume must be high-quality and engaging to capture the attention of hiring managers. But it also has to have all the right words and phrases to get past applicant screening software. That’s technology many employers use to filters out resumes that don’t meet the job qualifications.

Balancing all of that within a short document that must also convey your education, experience and passion for the job can be daunting. Many people turn to online templates to help them create a resume. But that tactic can leave your document looking exactly like everyone else’s. Instead, you might consider using a resume service such as Monster.com to ensure your resume is as powerful as possible.

Improve Your Resume with Monster

3. Upload Your Resume to a Job Site

Armed with new skills and a killer resume, you next need to put yourself out into the job market in effective ways. Consider uploading your resume to a site such as ZipRecruiter. ZipRecruiter lets you search for job openings by region, niche or keyword. You can apply directly for open positions, but you can also upload your professionally written resume so recruiters and headhunters can find you.

Find a New Job on ZipRecruiter

4. Use Networking Resources

Letting people know that you’re looking for a job is a critical step in finding out about as many options as possible. Uploading your resume on ZipRecruiter is a great step, but don’t forget to let friends and family know you’re looking. Sign up for LinkedIn and post on your other social networks that you’re on the job hunt. You never know when someone in your circle will know about a job that hasn’t been posted yet.

5. Don’t Give Up

Getting a new job can be hard, especially if you really want to hold out for something that you’re passionate about or works with your lifestyle. If you’re looking for a job during the COVID-19 pandemic, consider some ways to make money while you’re waiting for the right position to open up. And even in good economic times, don’t expect a job to fall into your lap the second you put your resume out there. Modern hiring processes are complex, and it can take time even if a company is interested in your resume.

Find Your Next Job

Whether you’re a new grad just entering the job market, a seasoned vet looking to make a change, or someone who has lost their job due to economic issues, hunting for work can be stressful. Make sure that you’re using all the employment resources available to you as you work to find a new job.

And if you’re dealing with financial struggles related to COVID-19, check out our coronavirus resources to learn more about assistance options that might be available to you while you’re looking for employment.

The post Employment Resources: Five Steps for Finding a New Job appeared first on Credit.com.

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5 Sacrifices to Help You Max Out Your Retirement Account Next Year

5 Sacrifices to Help You Max Out Your Retirement Account Next Year is a post originally published on: Everything Finance – Everything Finance – Its all about Money!

Are you at the point where you’re ready to invest more in retirement each month but aren’t quite sure how? Maybe you want to increase your savings rate but the numbers don’t add up. I’ve always said that saving something is better than nothing. If you can’t max out savings like your retirement account, it’s not a big deal and you can always work your way up to this goal year after year. We’ve put together 5 sacrifices to max out your retirement account.

Right now, the maximum contribution limits for a 401(k) is $19,000 and $6,000 a traditional or Roth IRA. This year, I was finally able to max out my retirement account contributions for the first time. I know how it seems like you’d have to fork over a lot of money each year to do the same thing, and that’s because you will. However, you can save enough to max out your retirement for the year and still live a comfortable life.

You may have to make some sacrifices, but they may not produce super drastic changes to your budget or your lifestyle. Here are 5 reasonable sacrifices to help max out your retirement account next year and every year afterward.

Your Car

One thing that you can sacrifice to help you max out your retirement account is your car. While you can probably save a ton of money by not having a car especially if you live in a big city, you don’t have to give up owning a car completely. My husband and I both drive older paid-off cars and we love it. With the average car payment hovering around $400 to $500 per month, that’s a lot of money to fork over each month just to drive.

In fact, $500 per month is all you need to max out an IRA right now since the annual contribution limit for anyone under 50 is $6,000. Since cars depreciate in value so much, it often doesn’t make financial sense to buy a brand new car. Used cars can be paid off quicker and you may even be able to buy a decent used car in cash. From there, you can use that money that you would save by not having a car loan and put it toward retirement savings.

 


Here are 5 reasonable sacrifices to help max out your retirement account .
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Live in a Smaller Home

My husband and I are sacrificing our dream home right now and I’m totally fine with that. We bought our first home a few years ago when we were 26 and 29 years old. It’s a nice starter home and it’s small. We don’t even have a basement but our family size is small right now so it’s fine. By having a smaller home and making it work, we save a ton of money on our mortgage, maintenance, repairs, and cleaning.

Now, would I love to have more space, walk-in closets or an extra enclosed room to serve as my office? Sure, but it’s not killing me that we live in a 1,300 sq ft home and instead I’m choosing to focus on what I love and enjoy about our home. I love how we have an extra bathroom and a nice fireplace in the family. We always have a decent-sized yard with a wrap-around deck and garden boxes that were already set up when we moved. Even though we are technically ‘sacrificing’ our dream home right now, I know that we will buy it later down the line and I’m content with where we’re at now.

RELATED: 6+ Easy Ways to Save Thousands on Home Repair

Frugal Travel

Some people give up traveling to pay off debt and save more. You don’t have to do this even if you’re willing to make sacrifices to max out your retirement next year. Instead of giving up travel altogether, find ways to make it more affordable so you can go on trips, and still invest generously. This is why I love frugality. Being frugal allows you to get creative and use the resources available to spend wisely on your values and save where you can.

Instead of paying for flights full price, you can wait for sales or sign up for a rewards credit card. Instead of spending tons of money on a hotel, see if you can stay with a friend or relative when you travel or book an Airbnb. Usually, when I travel, I’m not super picky about where I stay so long as it’s clean. I also plan to cook some meals if possible if our accommodations allow it.

I’ll usually book an Airbnb or a suite with full kitchen access so I can prepare breakfast and snacks. You don’t have to dine out for all 3 meals when you travel and breakfast is one of the easiest meals to prepare whether you have full access to a kitchen or not.

RELATED: How to Plan for Budget Travel This Year

Delay Your Gratification

We live in a society where people want everything fast and right now. This often leads to getting items and services before you can pay for them in full. If you want to avoid debt and living above your means, practice delayed gratification regularly and budget for larger purchases instead of financing them.

My husband and I used to have a ton of credit card debt, student loans, personal loans, and car loans. This debt really ate into our disposable income. Even after paying it off, I’ve still been tempted to finance things like furniture and other purchases. I choose not to and to delay my gratification. By simply waiting and planning, I save a lot of money and do a better job of committing to live below my means.

When you slow down on financing purchases and making impulse buys regularly, you’ll find that your budget is not so tight. You may even wind up with thousands extra each year that you can invest.

Your Time

Time is not a renewable asset. Once you use your time, it’s gone. You can never go back or relive a day where you wasted time. Keep this in mind when considering sacrifices to max out your retirement account. However, it should also be motivation to make good use of your time especially when it comes to working and earning extra money. If you’re looking to start maxing out your retirement account, odds are you’re still earning an active income where you’re trading time for money. If you want to earn more or increase your savings rate, you may have to get a second job or a side hustle.

Even if you want to establish a passive stream of income, you’ll need to dedicate time or energy to get that idea off the ground. Of course, sacrificing your time to work is not a waste. You can even make the most of your effort by choosing work that is enjoyable and fulfilling. Or start a side business where you can do things you love and still make good money.

Try to stick to your budget and save your money wisely to make it all worth it in the end. Pay yourself first consistently and remain dedicated to your goal in order to max out your retirement next year and each year afterward.

 

5 Sacrifices to Help You Max Out Your Retirement Account Next Year is a post originally published on: Everything Finance – Everything Finance – Its all about Money!

Source: everythingfinanceblog.com

How To Make $100 a Day Guaranteed in 2021 (40 Easy Ways To Make Money Online)

Do you need to make more money starting yesterday? Perhaps you’ve got an unexpected expense and just need cash now. Or maybe your paycheck is accounted for before you even get it? I get it.  The paycheck-to-paycheck cycle is the easiest situation to get yourself into and the hardest to get out of. Today let’s […]

The post How To Make $100 a Day Guaranteed in 2021 (40 Easy Ways To Make Money Online) appeared first on Incomist.

Source: incomist.com

Easy Ways To Make Money Selling Photos Online

This page may include affiliate links. Please see the disclosure page for more information. In these crazy times, many of us are looking for ways to make additional income. Launching a side hustle or online job takes time. Though we might have more of that, it’s still hard to know where to start. Selling photos online is…

The post Easy Ways To Make Money Selling Photos Online appeared first on Debt Discipline.


Easy Ways To Make Money Selling Photos Online was first posted on May 13, 2020 at 6:36 am.
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The Highest Paying Trade Jobs On the Market

Pursuing a four-year degree or higher isn’t for everyone. If you fall into that group, it doesn’t mean you can’t get a high-paying job. There are a surprising number of trade jobs that pay salaries at or above careers that require a four-year degree. They pay well because they’re in demand and are expected to grow for the foreseeable future.

To earn that kind of money, you’ll need to land one of the best trade jobs. And while they may not require a four-year degree, most do require some type of specialized education, typically an associate’s degree (which you can often get from an online college). That has a lot of advantages by itself, because a two-year education is a lot less expensive than a full four-year program.

I covered the best jobs with no college degree previously, and this post is specifically about trade jobs. Choose one that interests you – and fits within your income expectations – then read the description for it. I’ve given you the requirements to enter the trade, the income, working conditions, employment projections and any required education. After reading this guide, you’ll already be on your way to your new career!

Benefits of Pursuing Trade Jobs

For a lot of young people, going to a four-year college is the default choice. But when you see how well the trade jobs pay, and how much less education they require, I think you’ll be interested.

Apart from income, here are other benefits to the best trade jobs:

  • You’ll need only a two-year degree or less, so you’ll save tens of thousands of dollars on your education.
  • You’ll graduate and begin earning money in half as much time as it will take you to complete a four-year degree.
  • Since trade jobs are highly specialized, you’ll mainly be taking courses related to the job, and less of the general courses that are required with a four-year degree.
  • Some schools provide job placement assistance to help you land that first position.
  • Since most of these jobs are in strong demand, the likelihood of finding a job quickly after graduation is very high.

Still another major benefit is geographic mobility, if that’s important to you. Since the best trade jobs are in demand virtually everywhere in the country, you’ll be able to choose where you want to live. Or if life takes one of those strange turns – that it tends to do – you’ll be able to make a move easily without needing to worry about finding a job. There’s an excellent chance one will be waiting for you wherever you go.

The Best Paying Trade Jobs

The table below shows some of the highest paying trades you can enter without a bachelor’s degree or higher. However, most do require at least an associate’s degree (AA) or equivalent education. Not surprisingly, occupations in the medical field are the most common.

The salary indicated is the median for the entire country. But there are large differences from one area of the country to another. Salary information is taken from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook.

Trade Median Salary Education Requirement
Air traffic controllers $122,990 AA or BS from Air Traffic Collegiate Training Initiative Program
Radiation therapists $85,560 AA degree
Nuclear technicians (nuclear research and energy) $82,080 AA degree
Nuclear medicine technologists $77,950 AA degree
Dental hygienists $76,220 AA degree
Web developers $73,760 AA degree
Diagnostic medical sonographers $68,750 AA degree
MRI technologists $62,280 AA degree
Paralegals $51,740 AA degree
Licensed practical nurses $47,480 AA degree or state approved educational program

The table doesn’t list other common trades, like electricians, plumbers, elevator repair techs, welders or mechanics. To enter those fields you’ll usually need to participate in an apprentice program sponsored by an employer, though there may be certain courses you’ll need to complete.

The Best Trade Jobs in Detail

The table above summarized the best trade jobs, as well as the median salary and the basic educational requirements. Below is additional information specific to each job – and more important – why it’s a career worth considering.

Air Traffic Controller

Air traffic controllers coordinate aircraft both on the ground and in the air around airports. They work in control towers, approach control facilities or route centers. The pay is nearly $123,000 per year, and the job outlook is stable.

Education/Training Required: You’ll need at least an associate’s degree, and sometimes a bachelor’s degree, that must be issued by the Air Traffic Collegiate Training Initiative Program. There are only 29 colleges across the country that offer the program. Some of the more recognizable names include Arizona State University, Kent State University, Purdue University, Southern New Hampshire University (SHNU), and the University of Oklahoma.

Job Challenges: The limited number of colleges offering the program may be inconvenient for you. The job also requires complete concentration, which can be difficult to maintain over a full shift. You’ll also be required to work nights, weekends, and even rotating shifts. And since the pay is high and demand for air traffic controllers expected to be flat over the next few years, there’s a lot of competition for the positions.

Why you may want to become an air traffic controller:

  • The pay is an obvious factor – it’s much higher than most jobs that require a bachelor’s degree.
  • You have a love for aviation and want to be in the middle of where the action is.
  • Jobs are available at small private and commercial airports, as well as major metropolitan airports.

Radiation Therapists

Radiation therapists are critical in the treatment of cancer and other diseases that require radiation treatments. The work is performed mostly in hospitals and outpatient centers, but can also be in physician offices. Income is well over $85,000 per year, and the field is expected to grow by 9% over the next decade, which is faster than average for the job market at large.

Education/Training Required: You’ll need either an associate’s or bachelor’s degree in radiation therapy, and licensing is required in most states. That usually involves passing a national certification exam.

Job Challenges: You’ll be working largely with cancer patients, so you’ll need a keen sensitivity to the patient’s you’re working with. You’ll need to be able to explain the treatment process and answer questions patients might have. There may also be the need to provide some degree of emotional support. Also, if you’re working in a hospital, the position may involve working nights and weekends.

Why you may want to become a radiation therapist:

  • You have a genuine desire to help in the fight against cancer.
  • The medical field offers a high degree of career and job stability.
  • The position pays well and typically comes with a strong benefits package.

Nuclear Technicians

Nuclear technicians work in nuclear research and energy. They provide assistance to physicists, engineers, and other professionals in the field. Work will be performed in offices and control rooms of nuclear power plants, using computers and other equipment to monitor and operate nuclear reactors. The pay level is about $82,000 per year, and job growth is expected to be slightly negative.

Education/Training Required: You’ll need an associate’s degree in nuclear science or a nuclear related technology. But you’ll also need to complete extensive on-the-job training once you enter the field.

Job Challenges: There is some risk of exposure to radiation, though all possible precautions are taken to keep that from happening. And because nuclear power plants run continuously, you should expect to do shift work that may also include a variable schedule. The biggest challenge may be that the field is expected to decline slightly over the next 10 years. But that may be affected by public attitudes toward nuclear energy, especially as alternative energy sources are developed.

Why you may want to become a nuclear technician:

  • You get to be on the cutting edge of nuclear research.
  • Compensation is consistent with the better paying college jobs, even though it requires only half as much education.
  • There may be opportunities to work in other fields where nuclear technician experience is a job requirement.
  • It’s the perfect career if you prefer not dealing with the general public.

Nuclear Medicine Technologists

Nuclear medicine technologists prepare radioactive drugs that are administered to patients for imaging or therapeutic procedures. You’ll typically be working in a hospital, but other possibilities are imaging clinics, diagnostic laboratories, and physician’s offices. The position pays an average of $78,000 per year, and demand is expected to increase by 7% over the next decade.

Education/Training Required: You’ll need an Associates degree from an accredited nuclear medicine technology program. In most states, you’ll also be required to become certified.

Job Challenges: Similar to radiation therapists, you’ll need to be sensitive to patient needs, and be able to explain procedures and therapies. If you’re working in a hospital, you may be required to work shifts, including nights, weekends, and holidays.

Why you may want to become a nuclear medicine technologist:

  • You have a strong desire to work in the healthcare field, participating in the healing process.
  • Nuclear medicine technologists are in demand across the country, so you can choose your location.
  • The field has an unusual level of job stability, as well as generous compensation and benefits.

Dental Hygienist

Dental hygienists provide dental preventative care and examine patients for various types of oral disease. They work almost entirely in dentists offices, and can be either full-time or part-time. The annual income is over $76,000, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a healthy 11% growth rate over the next decade.

Education/Training Required: An associate’s degree in dental hygiene, though it usually takes three years to complete rather than the usual two. Virtually all states require dental hygienists to be licensed, though requirements vary by state.

Job Challenges: You’ll need to be comfortable working in people’s mouths, some of whom may have extensive gum disease or poor dental hygiene. But you also need to have a warm bedside manner. Many people are not comfortable going to the dentist, let alone having their teeth cleaned, and you’ll need to be able to keep them calm during the process.

Why you may want to become a dental hygienist:

  • Dental hygienists have relatively regular hours. Though some offices may offer early evening hours and limited Saturday hours, you’ll typically be working during regular business hours only.
  • You can work either full-time or part-time. Part-time is very common, as well as rewarding with an average hourly pay of $36.65.
  • Dental hygienists can work anywhere there’s a dental office, which is pretty much everywhere in the Western world.

Web Developers

Web developers design and create websites, making the work a nice mix of technical and creative. They work in all types of environments, including large and small companies, government agencies, small businesses, and advertising agencies. Some are even self-employed. With an average annual income of nearly $74,000, jobs in the field are expected to grow by 13% over the next decade. That means web developers have a promising future.

Education/Training Required: Typically an associates degree, but that’s not hard and fast. Large companies may require a bachelor’s degree, but it’s also possible to enter the field with a high school diploma and plenty of experience designing websites. It requires a knowledge of both programming and graphic design.

Job Challenges: You’ll need the ability to concentrate for long stretches, as well as to follow through with both editing and troubleshooting of the web platforms you develop. Good customer service skills and a lot of patience are required, since employers and clients are given to change direction, often with little notice.

Why you may want to become a web developer:

  • It’s an excellent field for anyone who enjoys working with computers, and has a strong creative streak.
  • Web designers are needed in just about every area of the economy, giving you a wide choice of jobs and industries, as well as geographic locations.
  • This is one occupation that can lead to self-employment. It can be done as a full-time business, but it can also make the perfect side hustle.

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers

Diagnostic medical sonographers operate special imaging equipment designed to create images for aid in patient diagnoses. Most work in hospitals where the greatest need is, but some also work in diagnostic labs and physician’s offices. The pay is nearly $69,000 per year, and the field is expected to expand by 14%, which is much faster than the rest of the job market.

Education/Training Required: Most typically only an associate’s degree in the field, or at least a postsecondary certificate from a school specializing in diagnostic medical sonography.

Job Challenges: Similar to other health related fields, you’ll need to have a calm disposition at all times. Many of the people you’ll be working with have serious health issues, and you may need to be a source of comfort while you’re doing your job. You’ll need to develop a genuine compassion for the patients you’ll be working with.

Why you may want to become a diagnostic medical sonographer

  • The field has an exceptionally high growth rate, promising career stability.
  • As a diagnostic medical sonographer, you’ll be able to find work in just about any community you choose to live in.
  • It’s an opportunity to earn a college level income with just a two-year degree.

MRI Technologists

As an MRI technologist, you’ll be performing diagnostic imaging exams and operating magnetic resonance imaging scanners. About half of all positions are in hospitals, with the rest employed in other healthcare facilities, including outpatient clinics, diagnostic labs, and physician’s offices. The average pay is over $62,000 per year, and the field is expected to grow by 9% over the next 10 years.

Education/Training Required: You’ll need an associate’s degree in MRI technology, and even though very few states require licensing, employers often prefer candidates who are. MRI technologists often start out as radiologic technologists, eventually transitioning into MRI technologists.

Job Challenges: Similar to other healthcare occupations, you’ll need to have both patience and compassion in working with patients. You’ll also need to be comfortable working in windowless offices and labs during the workday.

Why you may want to become an MRI technologist:

  • With more than 250,000 jobs across the country, you’re pretty much guaranteed of finding work on your own terms.
  • You’ll typically be working regular business hours, though you may do shift work and weekends and holidays if you work at a hospital.
  • Solid job growth means you can look forward to career stability and generous benefits.

Paralegals

Paralegals assist lawyers, mostly by doing research and preparing legal documents. Client contact can range between frequent and nonexistent, depending on the law office you’re working in. But while most paralegals do work for law firms, many are also employed in corporate legal departments and government agencies. The position averages nearly $52,000 per year and is expected to grow by 12% over the next 10 years.

Education/Training Required: Technically speaking there are no specific education requirements for a paralegal. But most employers won’t hire you unless you have at least an associate’s degree, as well as a paralegal certification.

Job Challenges: You’ll need to have a willingness to perform deep research. And since you’ll often be involved in preparing legal documents, you’ll need a serious eye for detail. You’ll also need to be comfortable with the reality that much of what takes place in a law office involves conflict between parties. You may find yourself in the peacemaker role more than occasionally. There’s also a strong variation in pay between states and even cities. For example, while average pay in Washington DC is over $70,000 per year, it’s only about $48,000 in Tampa.

Why you may want to become a paralegal:

  • There are plenty of jobs in the field, with more than 325,000. That means you’ll probably be able to find a job anywhere in the country.
  • You’ll have a choice of work environments, whether it’s a law office, large company, or government agency.
  • You can even choose the specialization since many law firms work in specific niches. For example, one firm may specialize in real estate, another in family law, and still another in disability cases.

Licensed Practical Nurses

Licensed practical nurses provide basic nursing care, often assisting registered nurses. There are more than 700,000 positions nationwide, and jobs are available in hospitals, doctor’s offices, nursing homes, extended care facilities, and even private homes. With an average pay level of over $47,000 per year, the field is expected to grow by 11% over the next decade.

Education/Training Required: At a minimum, you’ll need to complete a state approved LPN education program, which will take a year to complete. But many employers prefer candidates to have an associate’s degree, and will likely pay more if you do. As medical caregivers, LPNs must also be licensed in all states.

Job Challenges: As an LPN, just as is the case with registered nurses, you’ll be on the front line of the healthcare industry. That means constant contact with patients and family members. You’ll need to be able to provide both care and comfort to all. If you’re working in a hospital, nursing home, or extended care facility, you’ll be doing shift work, including nights and weekends.

Why you may want to become a licensed practical nurse:

  • With jobs available at hospitals and care facilities across the country, you’ll have complete geographic mobility as well as a choice of facilities.
  • You may be able to parlay your position into registered nursing by completing the additional education requirements while working as an LPN.
  • Though most positions are full-time, it may be possible to get a part-time situation if that’s your preference.

Start On Your Career Path by Enrolling in a Trade School

If you want to enter any of the trades above, or one of the many others that also have above average pay and opportunity, you’ll need to enroll in a trade school. However, in many cases it will be better to get the necessary education – especially an associate’s degree – at a local community college. Not only are they usually the least expensive places to get higher education, but there’s probably one close to your home.

Steps to enrolling in a trade school

Whether you go to a community college, a trade school, or enroll in a certificate program, use the following strategy:

  1. Develop a short list of the schools you want to attend to give yourself some choices.
    Make sure any school you’re considering is accredited.
  2. Do some digging and make sure the school you want to attend has a job placement office with a solid record of success.
  3. Complete an application form with the school, but be sure to do it well in advance of the beginning of the semester or school year.
  4. Apply for any financial aid that may be available. You can use the tool below to get started.
  5. Consider whether you want to attend on a full-time or part-time basis. Full-time will be quicker, but part-time will enable you to earn money while you’re getting your certificate or degree, as well as spread the cost of your schooling over several years.

Tax credits can help you afford your education

Even if you don’t qualify for financial aid, the government may still be able to help by providing tax credits. Tax credits can be even better than tax deductions, because they provide a direct reduction of your tax liability.

For example, the American Opportunity Credit is available for students for qualified education expenses paid for the first four years of higher education. The credit is $2,500 per year, covering 100% of the first $2,000 in qualified education expenses, plus 25% of the next $2,000.

Another credit is the Lifetime Learning Credit. It’s a credit for tuition and other education expenses paid for courses taken to acquire or improve job skills, including formal degree programs. The credit is worth up to $2,000 per tax return, based on 20% of education expenses up to $10,000 paid.

What to watch out for when looking for trade schools

When choosing a trade school it pays not to be too trusting. While that shouldn’t be a problem with community colleges, since they’re publicly accredited, there are a large number of for-profit trade schools that are not only expensive, but they often don’t have the best reputations. That isn’t to say all for-profit schools are scam artists, but the possibility is real.

Make sure the school is accredited by your state.
Don’t rely on assurances by the school that they’re accredited by some poorly known and totally unrecognized industry trade group.

Check out the school with reliable third-party sources.
This can include your state Department of Education, the Better Business Bureau, and even reviews on Yelp or other social media sites. If the school has burned others, you could be a future victim.

Interview people already working in your chosen field.
They’re likely to know which schools are legitimate, and which have a less than savory reputation.

Don’t ignore cost!
Don’t pay $30,000 at a for-profit school when you can get the same education for half as much at a community college. This will be even more important if you will be using student loans to pay for your education. Overpaying for school means you’ll be overpaying on your student loan.

How We Found the Best Trade Jobs of 2021

Just so you know our list of the best trade jobs isn’t just our opinion, we used the following methodology in including the occupations we did:

  • The occupations frequently appear on published lists of “the best jobs without a college degree”.
  • We focused on those occupations that appeared frequently across several lists.
  • We specifically chose fields that could best be considered semi-professional. That means that while they don’t require a four-year degree or higher, they do require at least some form of education, and in most cases, a certification. We consider this an important criteria, because career fields with a low entry bar can easily become saturated, forcing pay levels down.
  • As the table at the beginning of this guide discloses, statistical information for each of these occupations was obtained from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook.

Summary: The Best Trade Jobs

If you’re a high school student, a recent high school graduate, or you’re already in the workforce and looking to make a career change, take a close look at these trade jobs. They pay salaries comparable to jobs that require a four-year college degree, but you can enter with just a two-year degree or less.

That will not only cut the time, cost, and effort in getting your education in half, but it will also enable you to begin earning high pay in only one or two years.

Pick the field that’s right for you, choose a reputable trade school or community college, then get started in time for the next semester.

The post The Highest Paying Trade Jobs On the Market appeared first on Good Financial Cents®.

Source: goodfinancialcents.com

8 Remote Work Predictions for 2021

This story originally appeared on FlexJobs.com. The year 2020 has certainly been one to remember. Between a global pandemic, economic uncertainty, and the unprecedented transition to working from home for millions of people all over the world, remote work has had a big year. Indeed, the world of work as we know it has dramatically shifted in the last 12 months. As we look forward to a new year and…

Source: moneytalksnews.com

Chipotle to Hold Nationwide Hiring Event to Fill 15K New Jobs

Chipotle is kicking off the new year with a nationwide hiring blitz.

With hundreds of new restaurants in the works, the fast-casual Mexican food chain plans to fill 15,000 new openings, according to the hiring announcement.

To make headway on those recruitment efforts, all Chipotle locations are holding a “Coast to Coast” career event Jan. 14. On-site interviews are taking place from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. local time.

As a safety precaution, outdoor and curbside interview accommodations are available.

“Please bring a mask and follow all safety protocols while you’re in the restaurant,” the company said.

Pro Tip

To participate in the hiring event, you must fill out a brief application and select an available interview time slot at your local Chipotle. Do not show up without requesting an interview.

Compared to the overall restaurant industry, Chipotle has fared well throughout the pandemic. The company hired 10,000 new workers in July as it added new locations and built drive-thru windows at many existing locations. In November, Chipotle unveiled its first ever “digital” restaurant in New York to experiment with only providing drive-thru and pick-up orders.

Job Openings at Chipotle

Chipotle’s recruitment spree is focused on hiring new restaurant team members, which primarily consist of line cooks, food preppers, and cashiers. These positions are entry level.

According to job listings on the company’s career board, the main crew-member requirement is that you must be at least 16 years old to apply. All training is provided.

Chipotle doesn’t have a company-wide minimum wage. On average, crew members earn about $10 to $11 an hour (or local minimum wage if higher) according to thousands of self-reported wages on Glassdoor.

To entice new workers, the burrito chain has been experimenting with new perks and benefits available to all employees, part- and full-time:

  • Medical, dental and vision insurance.
  • 401(k) retirement plan after one year of employment.
  • One free meal per shift.
  • 100% tuition coverage for select degrees and universities through a partnership with Guild Education.
  • Tuition reimbursement of up to $5,250 for schools and degrees outside that partnership.
  • Paid time off including parental leave.
  • English as a second language training.

If Chipotle meets its hiring goals, the company’s workforce is set to exceed 100,000.

Check out these other employers that offer health insurance and cover college costs for part-time employees.

Adam Hardy is a staff writer at The Penny Hoarder. He covers the gig economy, remote work and other unique ways to make money. Read his ​latest articles here, or say hi on Twitter @hardyjournalism.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

Source: thepennyhoarder.com