15 Items to Keep in Your Tornado Safe Space

Did you know the U.S. has an average of more than 1,000 tornadoes recorded each year?

There are two regions with an excessively high frequency of tornadoes. Florida is one and “Tornado Alley” in the south-central United States is the other, according to NOAA.

If you’re in the part of the country that’s prone to tornadoes, you need to have a safe room to go to when the weather turns bad.

Your safe spot will shield you from the wind, hail and flying debris. A safe location should have no windows and could be a basement, storm cellar or an interior room on the lowest floor of your apartment building. An interior closet or bathroom in your apartment is also a safe place to hunker down in.

Items to keep in your tornado safe space

When you have to go to your safe space, you never know how long you’ll be there. It could be 30 minutes and it could be for several hours. You need to be prepared, not only with essentials but also with things to keep you and your family distracted and calm. We’ve organized a list to help get you through the storm with useful items for your safe space.

1. Water and snacks

Water and munchies are a must for everyone in your safe space. Plan ahead with water bottles and non-perishables. Keep foodstuffs organized.

Have a bag you can grab to take with you to a storm shelter or your safe space in your apartment.

water bottles

2. Baby and toddler food

Have a baby in the family? Be sure to have formula, bottles and baby food with utensils ready for your tornado safe space. Or, pack it to take to a shelter.

If you’ve got a toddler, have Cheerios and other favorites in resealable plastic bags for easy accessibility.

3. NOAA radio

You should get a weather radio so you can listen to NOAA Weather Radio. It will keep you tuned in to emergency info about tornado watches and warnings.

4. Footwear

You don’t know what the conditions will be like during the weather event and post-storm climate. FEMA recommends wearing closed-toe shoes like boots or sturdy sneakers. A likelihood of broken glass and other rubble that could prove dangerous.

shoes

5. Protective gear

In case of the tornado hitting full out in your area, be ready for anything. Keep bike helmets to protect from falling debris with you. Have a helmet for everyone in the family.

And if you have room and the time to drag it, bring a mattress with you. It could protect the entire family in case of flying glass, doors or other debris.

6. First aid kit

Prepare a small backpack with Band-Aids, antiseptic wipes and more, or buy a first aid kit that’s already full of necessities.

If a tornado warning occurs, you can grab the backpack on your way to a storm shelter, or stash one in your apartment’s safe space.

7. Sanitation and hygiene supplies

How long will you be in your tornado safe spot? Only Mother Nature knows for sure. Since it’s always better to be ready ahead of time, have a few personal hygiene supplies on hand. Think disposable towels, hand sanitizers, portable tissue packs, toilet paper and trash bags.

hand sanitizer

8. Necessities for kids

Be sure to pack a safe space or shelter bag with necessities, such as diapers and wipes for babies. Also, have a go-bag with anything special your toddler needs. Include favorite washcloths that could prove useful.

9. Flashlights

Power losses are likely when high winds blow. Be sure to have a battery-operated lantern and other flashlights. Also, plan ahead with extra batteries.

10. Cell phone chargers

Don’t risk your cell phone going to black. You may not have power, so be prepared with a portable universal battery cell phone charger. Find one with USB ports for several phones.

11. Personal docs

It’s always smart to keep important documents in one place. In a storm situation, keep them in a waterproof bag. Safeguard your passport, insurance papers and your checkbook.

12. Activities for kids

If you have little kids, be sure to have supplies to keep them busy while you wait out the wind. It will be a good distraction.

Charge iPads charged, bring crayons and coloring books, a board game and favorite stuffed animals for nap time. Have pillows and blankets, too.

coloring book

13. Adult distractions

Adults need their own versions of safe space distractions. Have your iPad mini and access to the novel you’re reading (or listening to). Bring your crossword puzzle book and the like.

Have pillows and a blanket in your safe space, too. These things could help make the waiting period for the storm to pass more bearable.

14. Dog or cat accessories

Does your dog or cat get traumatized in thunder, wind and rain? Have a thunder vest or shirt that they can wear. It can squash anxiety through gentle, constant pressure.

Create a spot where cats will feel safe to hide under a blanket. Also have water, food, treats and toys for your pets.

15. Meds and eyeglasses

Remember to keep your medications and eyeglasses (and contact lenses) with you in a storm. Keep headache pills and other medications you take in your safe space, or in the shelter bag you’ve packed. Include daily prescriptions, insulin, epinephrine auto-injectors and anything else you may need, along with contact lens solution and eye drops.

After the storm

According to the Weather Channel, it’s critical to be sure that a storm has truly passed before going outside. Check for updates on your NOAA Weather Radio, local broadcasts or cell phone. These outlets will be able to provide the latest weather information related to the storm where you live.

The post 15 Items to Keep in Your Tornado Safe Space appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com

Why More People May Buy Life Insurance in 2021

A federal law passed at the end of 2020 has made permanent life insurance more attractive to some people. The law essentially tweaks the tax code to allow owners of permanent policies to put more money into the savings portion of their policy. As we have explained previously, permanent policies, also known as whole life policies, are a combination insurance-and-savings vehicle.

Source: moneytalksnews.com

The Safest Place in Your Apartment During a Tornado

Tornadoes are no joke. With winds that can top 250 miles per hour, these storms can clear a path a mile wide and 50 miles long. Emerging from afternoon thunderstorms, tornadoes usually include hail and high winds. This is why you need to take cover when the warning siren goes off.

The average alert time for a tornado is 13 minutes, but there are environmental clues one is on its way. The sky transforms into a dark, greenish mass and begins to roar like an oncoming train.

Tornadoes can happen anywhere

Tornadoes occur all over the world, but, “In terms of absolute tornado counts, the United States leads the list, with an average of over 1,000 tornadoes recorded each year,” according to the National Centers for Environmental Information.

The U.S. experiences tornadoes all over the country, but one particular area gets hit the hardest. Known as Tornado Alley, the area covers South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Northern Texas and Eastern Colorado.

tornado alley map

Source: Accuweather

Whether you live in an area where tornadoes are common or not, it’s important to know how to stay safe in your apartment. Just as you create a plan for many emergency situations, know where to go in your apartment during these destructive storms.

Staying safe in an apartment building

On average, tornadoes move at speeds of about 10-20 miles per hour. They rarely travel more than six miles, which means they can damage a whole section of town. For that reason, if a tornado is in your area, seek shelter.

Basement

While basements are not an option in all apartment buildings, get low if you can during a tornado. Heading to the basement or even the sub-level of a parking garage offers the most insulation against the weather.

If your building doesn’t have a basement, try to get to the lowest floor if you can, regardless of whether or not it’s underground.

Interior rooms

The next safest option during a tornado is any area fully-inside the building. This means no outside walls. Under a stairwell, an interior hallway or even a room within your apartment can work. Make sure there are no windows.

Crouch down as low as you can get with your face down. Cover your head with your hands for extra protection or bring in a bike helmet to wear during the storm. Because of your location, there’s still a chance for debris to fall, so protecting your head is important.

Bathroom

Even if they have an exterior wall or windows, bathrooms are safe because the thick pipes inside the walls insulate you during a tornado. Climb into the bathtub if you have one and bring in your bed’s mattress to serve as a cover.

Closet

These are usually interior rooms by design, making closets a good choice to ride out a tornado. Pull your clothes off their hangers and grab any bedding from the shelves to insulate yourself. Don’t forget to close the closet door for even more protection.

tornado

Avoid dangerous areas

Tornadoes kill about 80 people each year, according to John Roach at AccuWeather. There was a decrease in tornado fatalities in 2018, with only 10 Americans dying. This is the lowest number since record-keeping started in 1875.

Yet, people still lose their lives to these dangerous storms. While knowing the safest places to be in your apartment during a tornado, you should also know what areas to avoid.

Windows

With gusting winds strong enough to shatter glass, windows become dangerous during a tornado. Even worse, once a window breaks, all kinds of debris can blow inside.

If you can’t stay completely clear from windows during a tornado, do your best to block them and protect yourself. If you can, duct tape a blanket over the window or slide a big piece of furniture in front to keep glass out of your apartment.

Heavy objects

While it may seem like a good idea to slide under your bed or inch behind a heavy dresser for protection during a tornado, it’s not. These pieces of furniture can shift during a storm or even fall through the floor. You don’t want to get pinned under or against something so heavy you can’t move.

Preparing for a tornado

If you live in an area where tornado warnings are common, consider creating a tornado evacuation kit to have on hand. These can include items you’d need to safely and easily exit your apartment after a tornado passes, such as:

  • Portable radio
  • Flashlight
  • Extra batteries
  • Cell phone charger
  • Bottled water
  • Spare set of car and apartment keys
  • Photocopy of your driver’s license
  • Cash

Having these items ready can make it easier to evacuate your building after the storm.

Remaining safe after the tornado passes

Being safe doesn’t stop once a tornado passes. Dealing with the aftermath of this type of storm includes new dangers. Make sure to watch out for fallen or exposed utility lines, downed trees or limbs and debris.

Exercise extreme caution when leaving your apartment building. If enough damage occurs, you may have to stay out of your apartment. You may not see the dangers, so it’s important to wait for an official word before reentering. When you can, take pictures of any damage to your own property since you’ll most likely have to file an insurance claim.

Preparing for the unexpected such as weather, fire or even flood means having the right supplies and the best information on how to stay safe.

The post The Safest Place in Your Apartment During a Tornado appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com

Joint and Survivorship Insurance: What You Need to Know

A joint insurance policy is one taken by two people, offering benefits that aren’t provided by single policies and allow you to save a few bucks in monthly premiums. If you’re married and want your spouse to receive a benefit if you die and your children to receive one if you both die, it seems like the best choice.

But that isn’t necessarily the case. Joint life insurance policies certainly serve a purpose, but there are some major flaws to consider as well.

What is Joint and Survivorship Insurance?

There are two types of joint life insurance policies: First-to-die and Second-to-die. In both cases, these options are generally cheaper than a single life insurance policy that offers the same benefit. As a result, they’re often taken by married couples who only have each other and their children to consider.

For instance, if you’re married with two young children and all your death benefit will be paid to your spouse and then, if they die, to your children, it can seem like the best option. You’ll be offered cheaper premiums, you’ll get your wish, and at the same time, you’ll be covered if anything happens to your partner.

Perfect, right? Well, not quite, as there are some problems to consider.

First-to-Die

A first-to-die policy pays money to one policyholder when the other dies. If you have a $500,000 policy charging $100 a month, then you and your spouse are responsible for paying the $100 and if one of you dies, the obligations will end and the $500,000 will be released to the surviving spouse.

Pros and Cons of First-to-Die Insurance

This insurance policy seems like a win-win on the surface. Insurance companies can save money by acquiring two customers at once and reducing liabilities slightly, while the policyholders can get the benefits provided by two policyholders.

But what happens if you break up? These policies are often acquired by married couples in their 30s and can last for several decades. At that point, they may have spent anywhere from 5 to 15 years together and are assuming they will spend the next 30 or so years together as well. But the average marriage lasts for just 8 years and no matter how connected you feel today, there’s just no way of knowing that your relationship will last.

If anything does happen, all those premiums could be for nothing. The policy will still exist and if you keep making the payments, you’ll keep the death benefit alive. But if you remarry, you’ll likely want the money to go to your new partner and not your ex.

This is the biggest issue with these policies and it’s why many insurance experts don’t recommend them for young couples. If you had two policies, you could just as easily make your spouse the beneficiary and if the relationship ends, you could remove them from the contract and add the name of your new partner.

What’s more, there’s no guarantee that this policy will be cheaper than two separate policies. First-to-die policies are actually quite rare, which means the market isn’t very strong. When competition is weak, prices are high, and in many cases, you may struggle to find a joint policy that is cheaper than separate ones.

Finally, let’s assume that the applicants are in their thirties and one of them dies when they reach 50. The surviving spouse then collects the money and can live comfortably thereafter. But what about their children? What about their new partner, assuming they find one? That policy will have finished, which means the surviving policyholder now needs to pay for additional insurance if they want to remain covered. That can be tricky for a 50-year-old widower, as premiums will have increased significantly.

Second-to-Die

A survivorship policy, also known as a “second-to-die” policy, is more common than the option outlined above. It is frequently acquired by married couples who want to provide cover for their children, and it pays out only when both of them die.

Pros and Cons of Need Second-to-Die Insurance

A second-to-die life insurance policy has its uses. It’s often recommended to individuals with large and valuable estates, as it can give heirs money to cover inheritance taxes and other costs and allow them to better prepare for the transition. 

However, if you’re an average married couple without sizeable assets, it likely won’t provide the benefits you need. Firstly, the surviving spouse won’t be provided with a death benefit and will be tasked with continuing to pay insurance premiums every month. If they have any financial issues, not only will they struggle to stay in the black, but they may be forced to stop making those monthly payments, thus rendering all previous payments redundant.

On the plus side, second-to-die life insurance is often cheaper than purchasing separate life insurance policies. It’s also much easier to acquire, as the insurance company is insuring two people and not one, which greatly reduces their risk and means they are less concerned about health questions and medical exams.

It can also improve the value of your estate, which is important if you’re giving this away to one or more heirs. Again, though, we have to stress that the benefits may not be enough for the average married couple and they should instead look into separate life insurance policies.

Which Policy is Right for You?

With all things considered, how do you know which policy is right for you?

Multiple options and several factors to consider, but it’s actually quite simple. Unless you have a large estate, you should look into getting separate life insurance policies for both you and your spouse. You can make each other the main beneficiaries and then add the names of your children just in case you both die at the same time.

If you have a large estate and your spouse will not be left financially destitute in the event of your demise, second-to-die life insurance should be considered. 

With all options, however, you can get quotes, compare the premiums, payouts, and benefits, and then see which one stands out the most. 

Look into term-life insurance, whole-life insurance, and accidental death insurance when considering an individual policy, as they all provide something a little different and both the costs and cover varies greatly.

Joint and Survivorship Insurance: What You Need to Know is a post from Pocket Your Dollars.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com

10 Essentials for a Homemade First Aid Kit

Having medical supplies in your apartment just makes good sense. A well-stocked first-aid kit can help you respond effectively to common injuries and emergencies, according to the Mayo Clinic . Especially when an urgent need for an adhesive bandage or ice pack happens.

Why not be prepared and tailor a first aid kit to meet your everyday needs? A homemade first aid kit for minor emergencies lets you pick and choose all the must-haves. It doesn’t need to cost a slew of bucks either. Start your medicinal scavenger hunt at your local dollar store, where you’ll likely be surprised by the inventory.

The first step, determine your budget. Spend between $10 and $20 and have plenty of handy essentials right at your fingertips. Your first aid kit can be easily stored neatly in a pantry, or beneath the sink in your kitchen or bathroom.

We’ve organized a list of basics to help you get your homemade first aid kit ready for use.

1. Pain relievers

pain medicine

Generic-brand pain relievers come in many formats such as gel, lotion and patches. Use pain relievers for headaches and to reduce swelling. Find them for less at discount stores.

You can also look for brand name pain relievers at your favorite big-box retailer, drug store or pharmacy. If you have a rewards card at your drug store, you can also look for two-for-one deals on the pain relievers that work best for you.

2. Reusable ice packs

Reusable ice packs, which you can store in the freezer, are musts for your first aid kit. They should be your go-to to reduce swelling from bumps and twists.

If you need an ice pack immediately but don’t have one that’s cold, make an investment and buy instant cold packs. They’re easy to use: Snap the seal inside or squeeze the pack and they get cold in an instant! Just be sure to look for ones that are non-toxic.

3. Protective gloves

Be cautious about cleanliness. Try to keep a wound that requires attention clean of germs by picking up non-latex gloves. Look for deals. Sometimes, they come in multi-packs.

4. Minor wound dressing

first aid kit supplies for dressing minor wounds

Think of what you might need to dress minor wounds from accidental falls or burns from cooking. The list could include:

  • Gauze pads
  • Elastic wraps
  • Assorted band-aids
  • Cute band-aids for littles
  • Adhesive tape
  • Bandage strips and “butterfly” bandages in assorted sizes
  • Antibiotic ointments
  • Antiseptic cleansers

5. Hydrogen peroxide

You can shop for hydrogen peroxide at the dollar store of choice. You can also save there on musts like hand sanitizer and non-latex gloves for whoever is administering the first aid.

6. Applicators

Be sure to have items you use every day, including cotton balls and swabs. They’ll serve double-duty in the bathroom for everything from ear cleaning to makeup removal.

7. Tweezers

tweezers

Look for tweezers for splinter removal in the health and beauty section. Get small scissors for cutting bandages or gauze to the right length, too.

8. Thermometer

To know for sure if someone is running a fever, you should pick up a thermometer and add it to the kit’s mix. Some digital varieties even come with disposable plastic sleeves. These are great if you have more than one child whose temperature must be taken.

9. First aid box or case

Check the automotive and household aisles and you might score a small, sectioned case with a snap-lock to store everything in.

10. First aid manual

It’s also helpful to include a first aid manual in your kit as a guide for treating minor injuries and wounds. Look for one with instructions on performing CPR and diagrams of how to perform the Heimlich maneuver, in the event of choking.

Need more stuff?

For more extensive homemade first aid kits, you’ll probably have to stray outside the bounds of the dollar store. Head to your local pharmacy or supermarket to pick up extra items.

Now that you’ve created a first aid kit for your apartment, you’re a pro! Create a second first aid kit to keep in your car. You never know when it could come in handy.

The post 10 Essentials for a Homemade First Aid Kit appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com