Chip and Joanna Gaines Are Back (With Friends) in ‘First-Time Fixer’

Chip and Joanna GainesRob Kim / Contributor / Getty Images

“Fixer Upper” fans will be in a tizzy to hear that Chip and Joanna Gaines have returned to TV—this time to help friends renovate their first house on the premiere episode of the new Discovery+ show “First-Time Fixer.”

In the premiere episode “Salt Lake City Condo,” Chip and Jo head to Salt Lake City to give old-time pals Brittany Baker and Annie Hawkins tips on their first flip: a $305,000 midcentury condo. Baker and Hawkins have a renovation budget of only $50,000, so they’ll need a lot of help from the Gaineses to get this project done right.

Read on to find out Chip and Joanna’s best tips for these first-time flippers, which might inspire some changes around your own abode, too.

Polished concrete floors are beautiful—and easy on the budget

floors
Chip Gaines suggested using concrete floors.

Discovery+

Baker and Hawkins need to stick to a strict budget, so they’re excited when Chip suggests they rip up the carpet and simply use the concrete floors underneath.

They remove the carpet and repair the cracks in the concrete themselves (which saves a lot of money), then they hire a professional to polish the floors.

“We’re actually going to save a lot of money doing concrete, because it’s only going to be 2,000 bucks,” Baker says.

Once the floors are finished, the concrete looks amazing, giving the condo a cool industrial look. Who knew you could get that for cheap?

Save as many original features as possible

bathroom
Chip thought this vanity could be saved, but some mold meant it didn’t work in the end.

Discovery+

Chip has another money-saving tip for Baker and Hawkins: Save the bathroom vanity.

“I would keep this,” Chip says when he sees the wood vanity. “This is great quality stuff, y’all. And this is something you could do in a kind of DIY sense and save a little money.”

Hawkins and Baker are willing to fix it up, but don’t end up keeping the vanity—and for a good reason.

“Brittany discovered so much mold that we did not want to salvage it,” Hawkins explains.

bathroom
With a new vanity, this guest bathroom is complete.

Discovery+

They’re forced to spend money on a new vanity, but they find a new piece with similar charm and style.

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Watch: This Gorgeous New Farmhouse by Chip and Jo Gaines Is No ‘Fixer Upper’

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When the bathroom is finished, Chip and Jo approve of the choice. It proves that while saving an old piece can save money, sometimes it’s simply not worth it.

Call in the professionals for a polished look

shower
This shower definitely needed some new tile.

Discovery+

With all of Chip’s talk of DIY projects, Baker and Hawkins want to do as much as they can themselves. They even cut their own baseboards and do all the painting. But after some debating, they decide to hire a professional to do the bathroom tile.

“We decided not to tile as first-timers,” Hawkins says. “We felt like it was advanced for what we wanted to do, so the money that we saved from carpet, [we] put it toward tile.”

shower
Sometimes it’s best to bring in the professionals.

Discovery+

The modern gray tile they choose fits the condo’s midcentury style and, in the end, Hawkins and Baker are happy they hired someone to make it look so good. And Baker’s learned an important lesson.

“Know your limits,” Baker says. “And maybe next time we’ll try tiling.”

Sometimes the right materials cost only a little more

kitchen
This kitchen was closed off from the rest of the house.

Discovery+

Sometimes the biggest renovation challenge is simply choosing the right materials, a lesson Baker and Hawkins learn when trying to design the kitchen.

The condo was built in 1964, so they want to lean into the midcentury aesthetic by using walnut in the kitchen. Right away, Joanna loves the idea.

“I love walnut,” she says. “If I walk in and see your kitchen with walnut wood, I don’t think ‘oh they did this on the cheap.’”

kitchen
The walnut cabinets make the kitchen look sophisticated.

Discovery+

Hawkins and Baker know that walnut won’t be too pricy, but it will require taking some money out of the budget elsewhere.

They build a beautiful kitchen out of this medium-tone wood and, in the end, it pays off. These cabinets give the whole condo a midcentury look.

An open walkway can save money

door
This doorway to the den has midcentury style.

Discovery+

Throughout the renovation, Baker and Hawkins realize they’re really cutting it close with their budget—and it doesn’t help when they keep finding unexpected costs.

One big expense they weren’t expecting is the door to the den.

“So guess how much a freaking door costs?” Baker asks. “A freaking door costs five to six thousand dollars!”

While they want to create a private den space, they know they can’t afford to put a door there. So they get creative with glass windows and a midcentury-inspired opening. This doorway ends up working even better than a traditional door because it keeps the den open, improving the flow into the living room.

It’s a great solution to the budget issue, and it ends up being one of the more beautiful features of the home.

When Baker and Hawkins are finally finished with the renovation, they know that they’ve gone way over their timeline. While they expected the project to take only nine weeks, it ends up taking four months. Still, they don’t go too far over their budget, spending $56,000 instead of their originally planned $50,000.

In the end, these novice flippers are proud of their work—and so are Chip and Jo!

The post Chip and Joanna Gaines Are Back (With Friends) in ‘First-Time Fixer’ appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

Source: realtor.com

6 Ways to Summer-Proof Your Home

Not only are we living through a global pandemic, but we’re also living through what is one of the hottest summers in many states. Here’s how you can protect your home from the summer heat and other woes you may face this season.

The post 6 Ways to Summer-Proof Your Home appeared first on Homes.com.

Source: homes.com

10 home features that have fallen out of favor

Trending: 10 home features that have fallen out of favor:
1. Bold color schemes
2. Industrial-style kitchens
3. Kitchen islands
4. Granite countertops
5. TVs in the kitchen
6. Over-the-stove microwaves
7. Raised-panel cabinets
8. Wall-to-wall carpet
9. Distressed wood walls
10. Mediterranean-inspired suburban McMansions

The post 10 home features that have fallen out of favor first appeared on Century 21®.

Source: century21.com

7 Creative and Quick Dining Room Updates

With so many dining rooms being converted into part of the living room or kitchen these days, dining room design has kind of fallen by the wayside. But if you’re one of the lucky homeowners to have hung on to a formal dining space, you’ve got an opportunity to make some amazing modern updates. Here are 7 affordable ways to breathe new life into an old dining room:

#1 Perk things up with paint.
Are your dining room walls still the same color they were when you moved into your house 10 years ago? If so, there’s a good chance the color’s a little past its prime. In fact, it may also be doing an injustice to your furniture and the updates you’ve made in adjoining rooms as well. Refresh the walls with a paint shade that makes you feel comfortable and cozy. The room will reflect that feeling.

#2 Modernize the lighting.
Are outdated chandeliers and lamps gathering dust in your dining room? Consider sending them packing and installing some recessed lighting and pendants in their place. Pendant lights, in particular, come in a wide variety of styles and colors sure to add some new pizzazz to your space.

#3 Repurpose another room.
If your dining room is located in an undesirable space — a cramped corner of the house away from the kitchen, for example — pick a new place for your table and chairs. Put them in the kitchen, if you have the the space. Or, place the dining table somewhere right in your living room, where there’s easy access to the TV and stereo. You should always feel comfortable during a meal, and being confined to an area you don’t enjoy doesn’t contribute to that feeling.

#4 Add some visual appeal.
Visual appeal doesn’t stop at paint and lighting. It’s also important to consider how wall decor may increase the interest and comfort of the room. Blank walls may make it easy to zone out and focus on your meals, but your guests will surely enjoy looking at something a little more interesting. Depending on your budget and the size of your dining room, consider hanging potted plants and colorful pieces of art. Just be sure to balance wall decor with other elements in the room so your space doesn’t feel like it’s cluttered with stuff.

#5 Throw in a rug.
One of the worst sounds to hear is a chair scratching against the floor as you go to get up from the dining table. So fix the issue. Add a rug underneath the table and chairs to make things soft and cozy. Choose a rug that isn’t too thick with fibers. Otherwise, your chairs can get stuck and twisted. Of course, you’ll also want to make sure that the style and color of your rug complement the rest of the room.

#6 Use dividers.
Many newer homes combine kitchen and dining spaces. If you want to create a dedicated dining space, think about incorporating a room divider. It’s much cheaper than installing a wall — and you can add shelves, plants or a sliding door to further divide the two spaces. Plus, the flexibility of the divider allows to revert back to the bigger space any time you like.

#7 Build in.
How’s your dining room designed? Do you have a table that sits in the middle with four chairs around it? If you want to make the room more functional — and create more storage in the process — think about ditching the clunky furniture and opting instead for built-ins like bench seating, china cabinets and buffets. A professional can create custom built-ins to suit any style.

The post 7 Creative and Quick Dining Room Updates first appeared on Century 21®.

Source: century21.com

What Should I Do if I Lost My Social Security Card?

A closeup of a brown wallet with various cards and dollar bills

You might not use your Social Security card every day, but you do need to use it occasionally. If you lost your security card, you’ll need to request a replacement form for a Social Security card from the Social Security Administration (SSA). You can apply online by choosing the replacement tab for your lost security card. Requesting a replacement card is not eligible for all 50 states.

The service is also not available if your valid driver’s license or passport was issued by US territory. This includes American Samoa, Guam, Northern Islands, Puerto Rico or U.S. Virgin Islands.

How Long Does It Take to Get a Replacement Card?

If you can get to your local SSA office just before opening, you can get in and out in about 15 minutes. If you can only go later in the day, the wait time could vary.

After the SSA processes your application, they’ll give you a letter indicating that a card has been requested. You can show this to anyone who requests a Social Security replacement card. Your new card will arrive within two weeks.

For online or mail requests for a replacement card, the application process could take a little longer. However, after your application is processed, you can expect your new card within two weeks. Once you get your card be sure you keep it in a secure place, such as a safe or lockbox.

Need to Replace Your Lost Social Security Card? Apply Online!

Creating a free my Social Security account takes less than 10 minutes and lets you replace a lost or stolen SSN card. To apply online at my Social Security account to receive a new security social card you need to meet these requirements:

  • You’re a U.S. citizen age 18 or older with a U.S. mailing address. This includes APO, FPO, and DPO addresses.
  • You aren’t requesting a name change or any other change to your card.
  • You have a driver’s license or state-issued identification card from one of the many participating states or the District of Columbia.

Don’t Want to Apply Online for a Social Security Card?

If you don’t want to apply online or can’t create an online account, you can visit your local SSA office. Before visiting your Social Security office, you’ll need to collect a few original documents to provide citizenship.

Documents must be current and show your name. You must provide your certificate of citizenship. There are two separate documents and you need one from each:

Citizenship:

  • A religious record made before the age of five showing your date of birth
  • A hospital record of your birth
  • A passport

Identity:

  • A driver’s license
  • State-issued non-driver identification card
  • A passport

If you don’t have any identification from the category or can’t get a replacement in 10 days, your SSA office will ask to see other current original documents. It will still need to show your date of birth, your name and a recent photograph. The following cards are acceptable IDs:

  • Employee card identification
  • School card identification
  • Health insurance card (not a Medicare card)
  • A military card identification

What if My Child Lost or Doesn’t Have a Social Security Card?

If your child has or can acquire a state-issued birth certificate before age five, you need to submit it. If not, you need to provide other documents to confirm their age, such as your child’s passport.

Anyone age 12 or older requesting a new Social Security number will need to be interviewed. They will ask for evidence to show that your child doesn’t have a Social Security number. Here are documents you can use to prove that a Social Security number wasn’t assigned:

  • If your child lived outside the United States for an extended period, a current or previous passport, school and/or employment records and any other record that would show long-term residence outside the United States.
  • If your child has lived in the United States and is applying for an original Social Security number, get information about the schools your child attended or may ask you to provide copies of tax records.

While using a certificate of naturalization to prove age or citizenship, you can’t use it as proof of identity. Proof of identity includes your child’s name, identifying information and a recent photograph. A child’s passport is preferred. If the document isn’t available they may accept:

  • State-issued non-driver’s card identification
  • Doctor, clinic or hospital record
  • School card identification

A parent must also provide proof of identity documents. The document must show your name, date of birth, and a recent photograph.

Why You Should Replace a Lost Social Security Card

Even though losing a Social Security card can be a stressful situation, applying for a new card is the best option. Your Social Security card and number are some of the most important documents you will need throughout your lifetime. It’s used when you get hired for a job, apply for federal loans, retire, do your tax returns and much more. And if the wrong person gets a hold of your card, you could become a victim of identity theft.

Memorizing your Social Security number isn’t the best option in this scenario. Your Social Security card is a government-issued document that still needs to be in your possession.

Always remember that monitoring your credit score and credit card should be an ongoing task. Once your information has been lost or stolen, it could be at risk. If you want to keep track of your credit score, get your credit report card from Credit.com. You can also get your free credit score.

If you have lost your Social Security card, use the information above to get a replacement. Always keep an eye out for your credit activity to make sure it hasn’t gotten into the wrong hands.

The post What Should I Do if I Lost My Social Security Card? appeared first on Credit.com.

Source: credit.com

How To Get Rid of Weevils: Tips To Purge These Pantry Pests

weevilsBackiris / Getty Images

It happens to the best of us: You aspire to bake some cookies, reach for the flour, and then realize it’s moving.

Welcome to weevils, tiny pests that can infiltrate a host of food products like rice, flour, and other grains. And unless you watch out, they may take over your entire pantry!

So, in case you have your own close encounter one day, here’s more info on what weevils are, whether or not they’re dangerous, and how to get rid of weevils and keep them at bay.

What are weevils?

Weevils are a group of beetles that are distinguished by their elongated snouts. Although they’re most often found noshing on food products, they sometimes also feed on clothing in your closet or furniture.

While there’s a crazy number of weevil species in the world—more than 95,000!— only three species are pests of household stored foods, according to Scott Lingren, an entomologist and owner of Venus Pest Co. The three you’re likely see in your home: the granary weevil, rice weevil, and maize weevil.

He says these weevil species lay their eggs in corn, wheat, oats, barley, or other grains. A single larva will develop and pupate within a six-week period. New adults that emerge from the grain kernel will mate and seek out more grain kernels to lay eggs in, continuing the cycle. Adults live for about six months.

The good news: Weevils don’t bite. The bad news: gross!

Odds are high that a weevil-ridden batch of flour is pretty much ruined, unless you enjoy eating these little critters. And even if your food is in bags or packages, that doesn’t mean it’s safe.

“Their chewing mouthparts can penetrate plastic and cardboard packaging, which will enable them to spread the infestation,” says Dave Lofquist, technical training manager for Arrow Exterminators. And they can spread fast.

“The adults can live for many months and are capable of wandering a good distance from the original infested item,” he explains.

How do weevils get into your house?

In most cases, you’re probably unwittingly bringing the weevils home with you from the grocery store.

“Most infestations found in homes arise from grains that are already infested when purchased from the store,” Lingren says. “In our experience in pest control, we have found that birdseed or bulk grains are the most common sources of infestation.”

Weevils can be found in all parts of the country because they are found in stored products, and those products are shipped all over the country. And you might not even be able to see them.

“Weevils’ egg, larvae, and pupal stages all occur within the grain, which makes detection difficult,” Lofquist says.

So, what if you (gulp) accidentally eat some weevils? The good news is they’re not harmful to humans, even if the gross-out factor is significant. And unfortunately, the chances that you have unwittingly ingested them at some point in your life are unappetizingly high. (Just consider it a bit of extra protein.)

How to get rid of weevils

Insecticide isn’t recommended for control of weevil infestations in home pantries, but preventing and eliminating them is fairly simple. Here are some tips:

  • Store grains safely. Experts agree the best way to keep weevils out of your food is to store your grains in sealed glass containers with tight-fighting lids instead of the bags and boxes in which they’re sold. Clear containers are a great option as they let you see more clearly if any weevils are in there. Always inspect your grains before using them.
  • Clean up spills. Even if you don’t see any weevils, clean up any spilled grains immediately. Weevils may be lurking in there, and you don’t want them spreading.
  • When in doubt, throw it out. If you find weevils in one product, go through your pantry and look for signs of infestations in other foods. Throw out any food that has signs. If you have unaffected grains, place them in sealed containers. Any remaining adults outside of these containers will have no food source and die on their own within a few days.
  • Forget the freeze. Some people suggest freezing food to kill weevils, which may work, but there will still be weevil eggs in your food that may hatch later on. And a bunch of dead weevils.

The post How To Get Rid of Weevils: Tips To Purge These Pantry Pests appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

Source: realtor.com

Home Buyer Checklist: What to Look for in an Open House

Open houses may be staged to look like a home decor dream, but don’t let that distract you from the real reason you’re there: to potentially buy a home. Make sure you can look past the neatly arranged furniture and focus solely on whether the house would be a good fit for you and your family. To help, here’s a home buyer’s checklist of things you might have missed at first glance.

Windows – Look specifically if they are facing the right direction to let sunlight in, and whether they open to a nice view (versus directly toward another neighbor’s window).

Under the Sink Cabinets – Check for possible signs of water damage due to leaky plumbing.

Electrical Outlets – Make sure there are enough outlets for the appliances and other electronics you’ll be using. If not, you can decide if that’s a renovation you’d like to make.

Storage Space – Don’t just look to see if there’s enough closet space, but look for closet placement. Also check that the storage is in a convenient location.

Appliances – If they’re included in the house, make sure they’re in good condition. They should be on and working while you’re there.

Under the Rugs – Lift up any rugs to check the condition of the floor underneath.

Floor Level – Check to see if the floors are level. Place a marble or another small, round object on the floor and see if it rolls consistently in one direction.

Attic – If the house has one, make sure it’s well insulated.

Water Spouts – Runoff from the gutters should be pointed away from the house, so take a step outside to see if this is the case.

This list isn’t all-inclusive, but it’s a good place to start. Talk to a CENTURY 21 ® agent to see what else he or she might add.

The post Home Buyer Checklist: What to Look for in an Open House first appeared on Century 21®.

Source: century21.com